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20121228
20121228
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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the program, a look at how the eurozone crisis is making life miserable for greece's rural population. >> but first, here are some other stories making headlines. thousands of sunni muslims are continuing their protests against the iraqi government, demanding the resignation of the prime minister, accusing him of sectarian politics. that's after bodyguards of the sunni finance minister were arrested on terrorism charges last week. >> the president of the central african republic has appealed to france and the u.s. for help against a rebel coalition that has vowed to topple his government. france has declined to intervene against the rebels who have already taken several towns and are now advancing on the capital. >> heavy snow has paralyzed large parts of eastern canada. in montreal, traffic came to a virtual standstill. police are telling people to stay at home, as some areas are expected to receive almost half a year of additional snow. well, we are going to a short break. after we come back, we will look at europe's crisis year 2012. >> we will find out how it will be a year to for
would love to, thank you. >>> greece has become the gateway to hundreds of thousands of migrants to enter the country, many of them muslims. athens remains the only eu capital without unofficial moscow. now there are plans to build one next year. will the bankrupt companies -- will the bankrupt country have trouble delivering? >> underground, crowded, a legal, the place of worship for muslims and athens. dozens of these poor rooms serve be a huge community. -- dozens of these prior rooms serve out a huge community. >> we respect all religions, but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832, the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of the greek
greece would have a worse depression than the great depression in the u.s. >> brown: a player in campaign politics, but what of the current debt debate? we talk with tea party ally, matt kibbe. >> warner: and as e.p.a. chief lisa jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january
; the impact of austerity in greece; the tea party and the fiscal cliff and the administration's environmental record. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: wall street was down much of the day, but trimmed its losses after news that the house will convene sunday to focus on the fiscal cliff. in the end, the dow jones industrial average shed 18 points to close at 13,096. the nasdaq fell four points to close under 2,986. also today, the labor department reported the number of new claims for unemployment benefits fell this week to the lowest level since march of 2008. president obama is urging dockworkers and shippers to avoid a crippling strike at atlantic and gulf coast ports. it would be the first since 1977. the workers' union contract expires this weekend, and a white house spokesman said today the two sides need to agree on a contract extension as soon as possible. talks broke down last week in a dispute over wages and royalties. the christmas season storm that blasted the south and midwest swept across the upper northeast and new england today and the death
story. that i would love to, thank you. >>> greece has become the gateway to hundreds of thousands of migrants to enter the country, many of them muslims. athens remains the only eu capital without unofficial moscow. now there are plans to build one next year. will the bankrupt companies -- will the bankrupt country have trouble delivering? >> underground crowded, a legal, the place of worship for muslims and athens. dozens of these poor rooms serve be a huge community. -- dozens of these prior rooms serve out a huge community. >> we respect all religions but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832 the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of
't get. see if you can do better. it wouldn't take much. >>> greece's national bank euro bank alfa and perez says they need the money following disclosures by the lenders last week. greece is concerned that the 50 billion euros set aside for bank recapitalization will be enough to cover the shortfall. >>> and the italian treasury is holding its last debt sale of the year. traders are expecting to see solid demand for the paper after rome placed nearly 12 billion euros of shorted dated paper just yesterday. still, they warn investors could become more discerning in the new year especially as the italian electric tore ral race on thursday. italy expects to raise around 10 billion euros next year. less supply. we know there's still plenty of investor demand and no sign necessarily of re-ignited concern about the longer term health of these -- you could call them peripheral economies. >> no. things have really improved. it's all still down to the ecb's pledge to support these countries if they fulfill the conditions. especially in the case of italy. the country is fulfilling conditions
't want to become greece or france or one of these stagnant slow growth welfare states. think evidence is very clear that fiscal policy does matter for an economy's performance. doesn't mean we have a recession if taxes go up but it does mean that government will be bigger and our growth rate in the long run maybe instead of 2.7, it is 2.6. that doesn't sound like much but because of compounding it adds up. adam: dan, i don't think there is any danger we become greece or france in a lot of ways. we're not a socialist country yet and greece is a whole different ball of wax. rich, the discussion about the economy, the spending cuts that they're talking about do put people out of work and that would have a negative effect on the economy, would it not? >> it would, adam. real quick, a bit of news here. president obama will deliver a statement at 4:45, something i imagine we'll cover live here on fox business. adam: we will. >> 5:45 president obama deliver as statement here at the white house. as far as spending cuts are concerned, you see this argument, you typically hear republicans say,
, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to thrive, and the fiscal union ask those are very slow going and though they may be moving quickly by european standards and i've been given the magnitude of the problem going very slowly. >> how should people be thinking about this? the average american, and they've been hearing about it for so long and they're not sure it will affect their pocketbook. do you think they will? >> and there's this incredible chance that greece will leave and the dominos will begin to fall. i think that's unluikely to happen as long as the ecb is willing to support that currency, but will it thrive? will those economies boom? i don't think so, i think it will be another year of recession and you will find individual opportunities and the stock picker's market and far as it's a strong growth, they're not there yet. >> thanks so much for joining us. good to see you tonight. >> you heard piers morgan talk about it with larry last week. af
continues on. tom, likely they will get less. the pensions in greece were guaranteed by the government, ma were cut as much as 35%. so, when you have government intervene shin in whainterventia private market enterprise, the public get hurt. like all of these safety net programs, the entitlement programs, once the seed is planted, they are almost impossible to get rid of, and left with a multibillion dollar deficit like in this case. tom: fha, we got into the mortgage mess because people had no skin in the game to a greatic tent, no money down, little money down, 1% be 3%, that is what the fha is still doing, making loans with almost no money down. why do you not expect a problem? >> we have got a problem. in my opinion, we got into housing crisis because of government, and as the administration takes laps about their successful bailout of general motors, that we lost billions of dollars o as taxpayers, we still have fharc, ha and fannie and freddie. tom: it is both of them are amazing. when it comes to fha, how -- this could take years to work this without, like you said, fannie and fredd
't become a country that looks like greece. [talking over each other] gregg: capitol hill and pennsylvania avenue, maybe they just think 16 trillion, 25 trillion, who cares. maybe they don't think it has a depressive effect on economic growth, and soaking up the credit markets, which women's businesses. >> that's exactly right. we don't have to wonder what this will go by. all we have to do is look over the pond and see what's happening in countries like greece and italy and spain and ireland have these massive debt. now we cannot repay them, massive interest-rate increases, you and i have talked about this before. but shame on us for not realizing that we stay on this path, we are in real financial trouble. gregg: stephen moore, economics writer for "the wall street journal." on her way to the fiscal cliff. thank you very much. heather: russian president vladimir putin accused of playing politics with the lives of orphans. signing a bill banning americans from adopting russian children. bad news has left dozens of american families heartbroken. amy kellogg is live in london with details.
become a greece. thank you both. >> happy new year's, guy. >> good to see you both. coming up, what exactly is going to happen if we go over the so-called fiscal cliff. what happens to your wallet. we will detail the five ways this is going to impact your family, your wallet and your finances. and also new york governor an drew cuomo is ready for a fight over gun control. he's even talking about confiscating weapons. how far is he going to go? all of that and more later. and sam donaldson tells tea party america this is not your country anymore. [ cheeping ] [ male announcer ] you hear that? that's the sound of car insurance compani these days. here a cheap, there a cheap, everywhere a cheap... you get it. so, what if instead of just a cheap choice, you could make a smart choice? like, esurance for example. they were born online and built to save people money from the beginning. it's what they've always done. not just something they cheap about. that's insurance for the modern world. esurance. now backed by allstate. click or call. >> as the likelihood of going over the fiscal cliff
to western turkey, or asia minor, and greece. for the next ten years, from 50 to roughly 60, paul will concentrate all of his efforts in this region of the aegean basin. it's probably ephesus and the areas immediately around ephesus that will be his most important base of operations. ephesus was a cosmopolitan environment. the inscriptions and the statues and the artwork and the buildings all tell us that this is really a crossroads of culture and religious life throughout the mediterranean world. >> when you read jesus' parables, you immediately think of agriculture, you think of peasants, you think of landowners, you think of farming. when you read paul's letters, you think of the school, you think the philopher, you think of the orator, you think of the city. >> in paul's view, at least, the city was the natural environment, if you will, for christianity. he has a way of coming back to the same city, he has a way of visiting new cities and talking about visiting new cities, and it was cities that he was going to, not just general geographical areas. it's important to understan
and reaching as far west as spain. to the east, it encompassed egypt, turkey, greece, and palestine, where jesus was born in the jewish land of judea, then ruled by king herod. >> in judea, the king, herod, was in effect a client king. he ruled almost in place of rome. he was the... he was the voice of rome, the instrument of rome, probably "instrument of rome" is best in that, because he... he had his own independent notions certainly. >> herod the great was probably one of the greatest kings of the post-biblical period in israel, but you wouldn't want your daughter to date him. he was ambitious, brutal, extremely successful. >> and it is one of the real untold ironies of jewish history that this man, who... who's the guy you love to hate in jewish history, really, leaves the most indelible mark on the face of the land of israel. >> it appears that herod thought of jerusalem as his showpiece. he really wanted to make it a place where people would come, just as people would have gone to athens, or rome, or the great cities of the mediterranean world. >> narrator: a meticulously accurate mo
and greece are also reported to want out. >> it costs to perform, and it costs to stage it. and what do you get back? bluntly a bunch of hoopla and a few pom-poms. it can be uplifting when the times are good. greece won it in 2005, but is it appropriate for the greeks to pump millions or billions in? i think austerity is one reason. but i think also the tone is another. is it right to be celebrating in spandex when your people are out on the streets? >> reporter: looking at some of the countries' economic scorecards, it's hardly surprising. greece is aware that taking part could be an issue. especially as its economy is expected to drop to minus 4.5% next year. portugal, meanwhile, is expected to shrink 1.8%. and poland and slovakia have decided to spend their money on other projects. that's despite projecting positive growth for 2013. ♪ it reportedly costs around $160,000 to take part. and if you win, some countries spend big to host the lavish event. for some national broadcasters, this is reason enough to pull out. >> the cost of staging has been mounting in recent years. russia put on
. my grandfather came here from greece. he opened a restaurant, the american dream. >> but he taught himself english. he taught himself to read the newspaper, and he became a very successful businessman. as he would say, only in america. youngstown was prosperous, and downtown youngstown was really prosperous. it was wonderful to go to downtown youngstown and be all dressed up in gloves and hat and going in and out of the shops and having lunch downtown. it was exciting. >> but that prosperity didn't last. youngstown ohio was the manufacturing backbone of this country but starting the late 1 1970s, the steel mill started to close, kicking this proud town in the gut. entrepreneur magazine named it one of the top ten best cities to start a new business. that's something that would have been unthinkable just a decade ago. >> it's a wireless device to allow students in the classroom to communicate with teachers. highly skilled, highly qualified people from a lot of good universities and colleges in the area, we were able to pick the best and brightest of for good paying technology jobs.
are talking about. >> the real cliff is america has become a greece. thank you both. >> happy new year's, guy. >> good to see you both. coming up, what exactly is going to happen if we go over the so-called fiscal cliff. what happens to your wallet. we will detail the five ways this is going to impact your family, your wallet and your finances. and also new york governor an drew cuomo is ready for a fight over gun control. he's even talking about confiscating weapons. how far is he going to go? all of that and more later. and sam donaldson tells tea party america this is not your country anymore. with the spark cash card from capital one, olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? smoke? nah, i'm good.
maybe, the worst is finally past, there's some hideous headline out of greece or portugal or spain or italy that the comes back with a vengeance and the s&p gets bashed down by a torrent of selling. that's why it's so important to prepare yourself and your stocks for the next catastrophe around the corner. expected or unexpected, so that you can make money in any market, or at least lose less and not just when things are going smoothly. you have to build this stuff into what i call your world view. you have to assume that somewhere, sometime, something will go wrong. i'm not saying you should be a super skeptic perma-bear, not at all. over the course of my 31-plus years in this business i've seen the averages climb way too way, watched the market make people way too much money to ever be that cynical and close-minded. being negative all the time has not historically been a lucrative strategy, and i don't see any reason why that should change now. there are a handful of incredibly smart, professional short sellers, hats off, able to turn pessimism into profits but i don't recommend
romney kept saying this country could be on the road to be more like greece if we did not get our arms around it. the unemployment rate remains high. are you optimistic in the short term about our country's future. >> it is hard to be. i tried to be. if we can get this resolved, this fiscal cliff situation, and have a pathway to seeing the deficit be reduced, cannot do it overnight, if we can see there is a path, a trajectory of slowing down the growth of spending to the point you can see the deficit will ultimately go away over a reasonable time, people will start investing again, hiring again, and i spoke to a business group yesterday and asked if they would hire just because they get a tax credit for hiring people. they said no. if you see the deficit will go away and there is hope we are on the right path to fiscal sanity, will you then hired? yes. we will have markets for our products and services and then we will need more people. we are stuck right now because all we have done for a year and a half was kick the can down the road. i voted against the act a year- and-a-half ago be
. but it's not working incr greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course. but turn off the news channels that are just cramming this stuff, and get involved in this before you formulate an opinion. i think we would be voted into office smarter, better people that are not tea party extremists. how about if on the democratic side grover norquist had said never cut any spending? i'm going to sign a bill that says never cut and spending. grover norquist, here's a great example, he does not even believe in economic case multipliers. host: gary says -- guest: what's interesting about the last election cycles is we had under president bush and the end, democrats seized control of congress in big numbers. and we had the big democratic sweep with the white house in 2008. 2010, republicans came sweeping back. we've had a pendulum swing, very contractive time period. that's one of the factors. we have seen both sides really dug in because they don't know where the pendulum will swing in the next direction. host: f
. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course. but turn off the news channels that are just cramming this stuff, and get involved in this before you formulate an opinion. i think we would be voted into office smarter, better people that are not tea party extremists. how about if on the democratic side grover norquist had said never cut any spending? i'm going to sign a bill that says never cut and spending. grover norquist, here's a great example, he does not even believe in economic case multipliers. host: gary says -- guest: what's interesting about the last election cycles is we had under president bush and the end, democrats seized control of congress in big numbers. and we had the big democratic sweep with the white house in 2008. 2010, republicans came sweeping back. we've had a pendulum swing, very contractive time period. that's one of the factors. we have seen both sides really dug in because they don't know where the pendulum will swing in the next direction. -- ekle
nothing other than, quote, this is a quote, damn us to becoming greece. patti ann: what would it mean if lawmakers fail to strike a deal? according to the tax policy center, 90% of the americans would see a tax hike in 2013. 121 million people would pay more in payroll taxes. families making between 40 and $65,000 a year would pay an extra two grand or so to the government. gregg: the big question, do lawmakers hope to get anything out of the last minute fiscal cliff talks or is it just for show? democratic congressman chris van hollen is the ranking member of the house budget committee. he will be joining us live coming up in the next hour what he really thinks is going on. patti ann: well the u.s. economy meanwhile could suffer yet another major blow. looming strikes at ports from next sass to boston are threatening to put thousands of americans out of work. with potential losses for u.s. businesses ranging in the billions. >> the port of baltimore is one of maryland's largest economic generators. any type of work action that may result in a suspension or stoppage of work would have
they got a tax credit for hiring people if we get this under control so we are not talking about greece and we are not talking ourselves to death. the fiscal sanity then yes, why, because we have markets for products and services i predicted at that point that act would be right where we are are going to be at the end of this year. we had a year-and-a-half to come and work together and build a bridge so that we wouldn't fall off the cliff. and what did we do? electioneered waiting until they are over. when he elections are more important than governing this country coming to get into the trouble that we are in. it's not just wild spending. it's not just tax loopholes. it's about governing and fiscally managing things as you go along. and it doesn't just have to be in the white house, it has to be in congress as well. >> given the frustrations in the process, if a grandchild can to you and said i want to go into politics, would you be discouraging of their intent? >> i would be straight forward with them. when i decided i wanted to run for governor, somebody asked me if my skill was big
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)